Flying drones in Denmark

Senest opdateret 01-11-2022

Welcome to Droneregler.dk - The Danish Civil Aviation and Railway Authority's offical site for rules, requirements and legislation for drones in Denmark.

Before you go fly in Denmark, there are some fundamental rules, you must know and adhere to. The Danish drone legislation is comprised of the common european rules, which apply in the entire European Union and national regulation regarding distance requirements, no-fly zones etc.

It is your responsibility as a drone pilot to know the rules and adhere to them.

The most common rules that most drone pilots fly by, remains within the open category. As a rule of thumb, the most common types of drones for regular consumers remain within the open category as long as you follow the rules as stated on this site.

Below, we give you an overview of the most basic rules and a guide to what drone certificate you need for your drone. At the same time, we give you some tools, so that you feel completely confident with drone rules in Denmark before you go fly.

Overview of the rules

  • Get acquainted with your drone by reading its user manual
  • Have your drone insured with insurance made for drones
  • Take the drone certificate, which fits to your class of drone
  • Do not fly higher than 120 metres above ground level
  • Do not fly beyond visual line of sight
  • Do not fly above people or gatherings of people
  • Do not fly closer than 5 km from public airports and 8 km from military air bases
  • Do not fly closer than 2 km from the helipads for emergency services (HEMS)
  • Do not fly closer than 150 metres from police stations, embassies or companies handling dangerous substances (i.e. refineries, petrochemical sites, oil depots or explosives depots)
  • Do not fly closer than 300 metres from military areas and vessels
  • Do not fly in environmental protected areas
  • You must have consent by the owner to fly over private property if it is surrounded by fences, hedges and walls.
  • If the property is not surrounded by fences, hedges and walls, you must not fly closer than 2.5 metres without consent from the owner
  • If you fly at night, your drone must be fitted with a green light that can be easily seen from the ground and make the drone easily distinguishable from manned aviation

Drone certificate

In most cases, you are required to have a drone certificate for you to be able to fly a drone in Denmark.

If you are an EU citizen, you must have a drone certifcate from your home country. When you have obtained a drone certificate you can fly without any prior approval from usas long as you adhere to both EU regulation and the Danish provisional rules. Non-EU citizens must have obtained a European drone certificate in whatever EU country you decide before being able to fly within the European Union and in Denmark.

What type of drone certificate if any depends on the weight class of your drone.

The lightest drones do not require a drone certificate, while light and heavy drones up to 25 kg only require a theoretical drone certificate. However, flying with drones in the medium weight category requires a drone competence certificate where the drone pilot has performed practical self training before taking the theoretical exam.

A common denominator for all the categories is that the weight of the drone determines what type of drone certificate you need.

A1/A3

Light drones are governed by the theoretical drone certificate A1 while heavy drones are governed by the theoretical drone certificate A3. When taking the exam for the theoretical drone certificate, A1 and A3 are combined as the theoretical knowledge required for both categories are the same.

When passing the theoretical test, you may fly with light class drones and the heaviest drones up to 25 kg. You do not need the A2 certficate prior to flying the heavy drones. The reason that people may fly the heavy drones solely based on a theoretical exam is because the heaviest drones can only be flown outside built-up areas where the danger of crashing into people is lower.

 

 

A2

In between A1 and A3, you find the class for medium sized drones, where you will need the drone competence certificate A2. With this drone certificate, you get some privileges that you do not have for the drones in the categories of A1 and A3. Naturally then, the demands for flying with A2 drones are higher. This means that you must have completed practical self training before you take the supplementary exam for the drone competence certificate A2.

With the drone competence certificate A2 you are e.g. allowed to fly closer to airports. Furthermore, you are allowed to fly closer to people. Thus, you need to demonstrate a higher level of practical skills in the A2 category than for the theoretical drone certificates A1/A3.

You cannot take the test for the drone competence A2 without having taken the theoretical drone competence certificate A1/A3 and completed practical self training first

Guide: Which rules to follow for your drone

Are your drone marked with a C0, C1, C2, C3 or C4 mark?

If your drone has a mark as shown below with a number of 1 to 4, it is a C marked drone. If not, it will fall under the term legacy drone.
The majority of drone on the market right not [2022] is legacy drones.

Get to know the regulation

It is good to know the rules put forward above. But they are just a selection of the most important rules to know. Thus, as a drone pilot, you must know where in the legislation you will find further information if you ever doubt what you are allowed to do.

Furthermore, the rules you find on droneregler.dk only adresses information regarding flights with drones. This means that there may be additional legislation, requirements and rules, which you may need to follow on a national or a local level. The Danish privacy laws is a good example of this. Another example on a local level is the rules, which apply to nature areas where the municipality maintains protected areas for certain wildlife that prohibits you from disturbing the type of wildlife in question. You will not find this kind of information in the rules and regulation found here on droneregler.dk. Thus, it is important that you find out if special rules apply for the area you wish to fly.

 

Order on drones

The order on drones comprise the national rules for flights with drones. As the European implementing regulation makes no mention of distance requirement, Denmark as an EU member state is allowed to implement rules that e.g. provide distance requirements to airports, air bases and various safety and security critical areas and envrionmental protected areas.

The full title of the order on drones is Order no. 2253 of 29/12/2020 - Order on supplementary provisions regarding Commission implementing regulation (EU) 2019/947 of 24 May 2019 on the rules and procedures for the operation of unmanned aircraft

Order no. 2253[Danish - New window]

Implementing regulation on drone operations

Drone flights in EU and other countries are subject to the drone implementing regulation, which lays down the general conditions and requirements for flights with drones in various categories and weight classes. It is also here that you will find the rules regarding distance to people, assemblies of people and built-up areas if applicable.

The full title of the drone implementing regulation is COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2019/947 of 24 May 2019 on the rules and procedures for the operation of unmanned aircraft

(EU) 2019/947 [New window]

Implementing regulation on drone systems

The implementing regulation on drone systems is primarily aimed towards manufacturers of drone systems where you find all requirements for C marked drones. Are the requirements for a C marked drone system fulfilled and approved by EASA you do not have to fly in accordance with the transitional rules for legacy drones.

The full title of the implementing regulation on drone systems is: COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2019/947 of 24 May 2019 on the rules and procedures for the operation of unmanned aircraft


(EU) 2019/945 [New window]

Droneluftrum: Where to fly in Denmark

As mentioned above, the order on drones prescribes places in Denmark where you are allowed to fly and not to fly, notwithstanding what type of drone you have. However, the order does not mention where these areas are specifically. So to give you the overview, we have developed Droneluftrum to convey the information in cooperation with NAVIAIR, Droneluftrum can accessed both as a website and in an app on the most common types of smartphones and tablets.
The information that you find on Droneluftrum is a visualisation of the respective restricted spaces in Denmark and their distance requirements as stated in Order no. 2253.

The various area categories are marked with different colours, which make it easier for you to find out what areas to avoid or what to do if you wish to fly close to or in the different types of areas.

However, there are areas in Denmark, which you do not find on Droneluftrum as they are either not part of the order on drones or requires a permission from private persons or organisations. Thus, it is important that you also orient yourself towards where you can fly in a specific area at the relevant municipal or other local entities. Furhermore, if you wish to fly closer than 2.5 metres of private property or over other peoples properties that are surrounded by fence, hedge or wall, you need express consent from the owner.

Area colours

HEMS, public air fields, military air bases or restriction areas or so-called drone zones where drone flights are prohibited.

Around the air fields, air bases and HEMS you find a stronger marked out red colour from the runways or helipads. This stronger marking delineates HEMS with 1 km from the center of the helipad and public air fields and military air bases with 2 km from the center of the runways respectively. Within these areas, flights with drones are prohibited for everyone.

Surrounding the strong red marking, you find a lighter red marking, which delineates the area wherere you can fly maximum 40 metres above the height of the runway or 50 metres above the height of the helipad. However, you must have a drone competence certificate A2 before you can do this.

If the red colour is indicative of a restriction area, there are no lighter markings surrounding the area. That is because flights with drones are generally prohibited (unless the description of the area explicitly states that drone flights are allowed).

Airports, air bases, permanent and temporary restriction areas are mentionen in the order on drones, section 6 (order no. 2253). The restriction areas are based on NOTAMs - Notice To AirMen is A special announcement for manned aviation regarding changes that may effect air traffic.

The yellow areas can be either seen as yellow outer markings as lines or with yellow markings. The yellow areas are restriction areas (red ares), which have not yet been activated yet.

If the area is marked with yellow lines only, the area is not planned to close the same day (until 12 a.m.). However, if the area has a yellow marking, the area will be activated and change colour to red the same day (until 12 a.m.)

Drone flights in yellow marked areas is permitted, But be aware about when the area will close if the area is to be activated the same day. The reason that the areas are visible even before they close is so that you are able to plan your flights accordingly,

When the area is to close the same day (yellow marked area), cause and time for the activation can be read by clicking on the area.

These areas are collected from AIP Danmark. Activation of the drone zone/restriction area is closed based on a NOTAM - Notice To AirMen is A special announcement for manned aviation regarding changes that may effect air traffic 

The green areas visualise noise sensitive nature areas (BL 7-15), which formally are administered by The Danish Environmental Protection Agency.

Drone flights in these areas are generally prohibited, unless you have a permission from The Danish Civil Aviation and Railway Authority (in consultation with The Danish Environmental Protection Agency) or if you are assigned to perform e.g. counting of game or inspections for the administrator of the area in question.

The green areas are regulated under the order on drones, section 9 (Order no. 2253).

 

The blue marked areas visualise:

  1. Royal resisences, Danish Parliament - Christiansborg castle, The residence of the Danish prime minister - Marienborg, companies handling dangerous substances (i.e. refineries, petrochemical sites, oil depots or explosives depots), Police buildings and institutions under the Prison service. You must keep 150 metre distance to these areas.
  2. Militay areas and vessels. You must keep a 300 metre distance to these areas

Here dronefligths are a as a rule prohibited unless you:

Her er droneflyvning som udgangspunkt ikke tilladt medmindre du:

  1. have a permission from The Danish Civil Aviation and Railway Authority
  2. have a permission from the Danish Defence Command

Rules regarding the places and distances to these are mentioned in section 7 and 8 of The order on drones (Order no. 2253)

The orange areas are areas where you generally are allowed to fly. The areas a not subject to any sections of Order no. 2253 as they e.g. visualise smaller and/or private air fields, model air fields, civil heliports, seaplane landing areas or parachute landing areas.

As there may be greater activity of various kinds, you must as a remote pilot excercise proper care and attention before, during and after the drone flight. You are responsible for giving way to manned aviation.

These places are collected from AIP Danmark

Even though you do not need permission from The Danish Defence or The Danish Civil Aviation and Railway Authority to fly in a certain area, you might still need to ask for permission by others before you fly. These may be:

Private properties: Permission from the owners of private properties are required if you wish to overfly them. If the area is enclosed with fences, hedges or walls, you need permission just to cross these. If the property is not enclosed with fences, hedges or walls, you must have permission by the owner, if you fly closer than 2.5 metres of any building on the property.

Properties of municipal, local or other governmental actors: The municipals, local or other governmental actors may lay down rules for how to fly in areas owned by them. These areas are generally not open to the public on foot without having been granted permission personally or through signage by the owner to enter. Such places includes parks with opening hours, castles and other areas with a defined purpose. A rule of thumb is that such areas have opening hours, thus limiting public access.

Exceptions

  • Drones weighing below 250 grams with a camera and other payload mounted, do not require a drone certificate
  • Drones weighing below 250 grams with a camera and other payload mounted, do not need to be insured - However, it is a good idea
  • Does your drone weigh below 250 grams with a camera and other payload mounted, you may overfly people. However, as shortly as possible and never over assemblies of people
  • With the drone competence certificate A2, you may fly until 2 km from any public air field or military air base. However, not higher than 40 metres above runway height
  • With the drone competence certificate A2, you may fly until 1 km from any HEMS helipad. However, not higher than 50 metres above the helipad.
  • You need permission from The Danish Civil Aviation and Railway Authority if you wish to fly closer than 150 metres to police stations, embassies and companies handling dangerous substances (i.e. refineries, petrochemical sites, oil depots or explosives depots)
  • You need permission from The Defence Command if you wish to fly closer than 300 metres to military areas or vessels
  • You need permission from The Danish Civil Aviation and Railway Authority if you as a holder of a drone competence certificate A2 wish to fly closer than 1 km of an HEMS or 2 km of a public air field or military air base

See how you apply for special permissions here [Danish]

The other categories - The specific category and the certified category

You have just been reading all the most common rules that apply to most remote pilots when flying within the open category.
If you want to fly besides the rules and requirements as stipulated in the open category, your operation will most likely fall under the specific category or, in rare cases, the certified category.

The specific category

The specific category encompasses all kinds of drone flights that do not fall under the clearly defined rules of the open category

Examples may be:

  • Flights with drones weighing more than 25 kg
  • Drone flights above assemblies of people
  • Dropping of objects from drones
  • Drone flights beyond visual line of sight

The above-mentioned list is not an exhaustive list of the various types of drone operations, which fall under the specific category. However, they are a representation of drone flights with increased risk for people on the ground of manned aviation.

Flights in the specific category require an operational authorisation, which is issued by The Danish Civil Aviation and Railway Authority based on a risk assessment. This can either be a specific operations risk assessment, where the drone operator assesses risks posed on people on the ground an for manned aviation, or an approved standard scenario or a pre-defined risk assessment, where the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has worked out the risk assessment for the drone operator.

What to do when flying in the specific category can be read in EASAs Easy Access Rules Article 5

Find EASA Easy Access Rules here [New window]

English

Cross-border applications

Permissions for drone operations taking place in other countries than the operators home country are called cross-border operations. Cross-border permissions are only granted on the basis of existing operational authorisations.
Operational authorisations can only be granted by the competent authority of the country you are from, if you are from a country, that has implemented EASA rules.

This means that your application for flights within the specific category must be sent to the Civil Aviation Authority of your country of origin for an operational area in your home country. When an operational authorisation from your home country has been issued, you may use this to apply for a similar flight in another EASA country (Including Denmark) by assessing operational, strategic and tactical mitigations related to local and national rules and procedures for the country you wish to fly in. 

You apply for cross-border operations to the competent authority in the country you aim at flying in. Even though you apply to that countrys competent authority, it is still the competent authority of your home country that ultimately approves of the operation with recognition from the country you wish to fly in. 

How to apply for a cross-border operation can be found in  EASAs Easy Access Rules Article 13

Find EASA Easy Access Rules here [New window]

If you are a drone operator from outside an EASA country, the competent authority of the country you choose to conduct operations in first, will be your competent authority. This means that the competent authority in question will handle your cross-border applications if you plan to fly in another EASA country subsequently.

Cross-border application form

When submitting a cross border application, we ask you to fill out the application sheet outlining the operations you are planning on conducting in Denmnark. 
The application will ask you to reference all relevant documentation, which needs to be enclosed in your overall cross border application.

Download the cross-border application form here

The certified category

The certified category is meant for drone operations where the risk levels posed to people and manned aviation surpass what can be handled by the risk assessment framework of the specific category. This is e.g. operations that include transport of people or the transport of dangerous goods. However, it may also be operations that exceeds the risk matrices of the specific categories. 

The actual framework for the certified category is yet to be fully developed by EASA. Thus, an application in the certified category will be part of the developing work of the categoru where both The Danish Civil Aviation and Railway Authority and EASA would need to assess any rask assessment. You must expect that an application within the certified category will need comprehensive assessment by both authorities.